k-pop girl

joi, 22 iunie 2017

Big Bang Band Member Justin Lyons Shares his POV of the G-Dragon World Tour

This seems to be the 2nd part in a longer series he will be releasing. Episode 1 was on Seoul (which is blow) and episode 2 is on Macau.

Episode 2:


Episode 1:



Source: Justin Lyon’s Youtube/ @Guitarslayer24

Preview for Daesung on “Fantastic Duo 2”

The episodes will air 6/25 and 7/2 at 6:25pm KST.

Preview for Daesung on "Fantastic Duo 2" [VIDEO]

Gaon Confirms G-Dragon’s USB Won’t Be Counted As A Physical Album, YG Responds

Gaon Confirms G-Dragon’s USB Won’t Be Counted As A Physical Album, YG Responds
Gaon officially announced on June 19 that they will not be counting G-Dragon’s “Kwon Ji Yong” USB as a physical album on their charts.
Gaon said, “If you look at the definition for ‘record’ in revised copyright law, it’s possible the ‘Kwon Ji Yong’ USB could be considered a ‘record.’ However, Gaon Chart’s definitions of ‘album’ and ‘record’ are not the same, and [‘albums’] are limited to devices that have music on them.
“As a result, according to copyright law, the ‘Kwon Ji Yong’ USB will be categorized as a download service, and it will be counted toward digital and download charts.”
A source from YG responded to the announcement, saying, “We respect Gaon Chart’s decision. What’s important to G-Dragon is the music, although the fixed physical form and outdated chart aggregation methods are a shame.”
The source continued, “The world is changing so fast, and the development of IT technology is moving even faster. Our opinion that trying to limit album sales and chart aggregation to hard-to-find cassette tapes and CDs is outdated has not changed.
“Nowadays, most people don’t save music to their phones, just information. This is because now with fast internet, more information [and music] can be freely streamed and shared. If Gaon Chart’s reasoning is that the USB doesn’t have music on it and therefore can’t be counted as a physical album, then digital charts should also only count downloads and not streaming.”

Seungri in “Monkey Museum” Party Highlights

Natural High Records releases a highlights video from the “Monkey Museum” party in Changsha, China held in May:



G-Dragon with Concert Organizer/Promoter Reggie Martin

G-Dragon with Concert Organizer/Promoter Reggie Martin [PHOTO]
reggiemartin10: G-Dragon 🐉one of the best artist in the world with great band members if you have not seen his show you must see him. The show was great last night at Venetian Macau. #gdragon #macau #gdragonbigbang #kpopmusic #ilovemusic #hiphopmusic #kpopdance #kpopdancer #musicproducer #songwriter #macao #kpopstuff #reggiemartin #ygentertainment #gdragonconcert #gdragonvip

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea

More photos of G-Dragon from Elle Korea’s July 2017 issue:

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]
More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]  More G-Dragon for Elle Korea (July 2017) [PHOTOS]

Billboard: G-Dragon’s ‘Kwon Ji Yong’ USB Release Opens Debate About What Makes an Album

Billboard: G-Dragon's 'Kwon Ji Yong' USB Release Opens Debate About What Makes an Album
While G-Dragon’s Kwon Ji Yong made a major debut on the Billboard 200 last week, the album’s physical release has found a bit of a snag on its album charts at home. As Billboard previously reported, the five-track release is currently considered ineligible for South Korea’s domestic Gaon Chart due to its USB flash drive format that links out to song downloads rather than actually containing the music, per chart operator the Korean Music Content Industry Association (KMCIA).
The issue has drawn debate from fans and industry executives, with the BIGBANG leader himself commenting on the issue, writing, “Isn’t the most important thing for music a good melody that will linger on the ears, mouths and minds of people for a long time and the lyrics that can touch people and make them laugh and cry?” The issue goes further as G-Dragon’s rankings will be affected on Korean music-chart programs where top-selling artists all vie for the coveted honor of being named the week’s top release.
Notably, a USB-only release would be considered eligible on the Billboard charts with American sales of G-Dragon’s Kwon Ji Yong album — in all its forms, whether it be the physical USB or digital — eligible to count on the album charts, as long as the sales are reported to Nielsen Music.
KMCIA has defended their decision based on South Korean copyright law that sees an album as a physical object with music. When one puts the flash drive into their device, a folder containing a hyperlink leads the consumer to a Website featuring three pages: one with the individual song downloads, one with photos and the last with videos including music videos and exclusive, behind-the-scenes footage of the album photo shoot.
The issue ultimately opens-up a larger debate of what does count as an album today. Does an “album sale” ultimately change when it leads the consumer to a Website to download its individual tracks instead of a physical disc that seamlessly plays all the music? Or is simply the act of buying an artist’s physical music product — regardless of how the songs are presented — what makes it a purchase with impact? And who’s to decide what is and is not impactful? They’re all interesting questions.
While the Gaon chart does not incorporate streaming or individual track sales in its album-sales counts like the Billboard 200, singles rankings do with Kwon Ji Yong’s lead cut “Untitled, 2014” already giving GD his latest No. 1 on Gaon Digital Chart and proving the record’s music is, in fact, massively popular. But album charts are also considered a major marker of a record’s success for those choosing to support the artist’s full body of work instead of just the single, which helps explain the controversy over the decision. Furthermore, high physical album sales for a K-pop act indicates substantial national popularity with only select acts having album sales worth bragging about when the numbers are revealed. With music so widely and much more easily available via streaming and YouTube, not to mention the competitive music programs also counting listening statistics, are fans even really listening to the music on the physical CDs or does it merely represent an important step and trinket in fandom culture?

Click here to finish reading the article at Billboard.com

Source: Billboard

G-Dragon’s ‘Kwon Ji Yong’ Physical Sales Excluded From Korean Charts

Billboard: G-Dragon's 'Kwon Ji Yong' USB Release Opens Debate About What Makes an Album  Billboard: G-Dragon's 'Kwon Ji Yong' USB Release Opens Debate About What Makes an Album
With streaming’s rise, there are many ways to release songs and albums nowadays, and the most recent album by K-pop icon G-Dragon spurred controversy because of it.
The BIGBANG member’s eponymous solo EP Kwon Ji Yong debuted on the Billboard 200 within a day of its release last week but was considered ineligible for Korea’s Gaon Chart. The chart’s operator, the Korean Music Content Industry Association (KMCIA), determined that the EP was not a true physical album since GD decided to sell USBs that linked to the songs rather than CDs with the songs on them.
The KMCIA said that G-Dragon’s highly personal five-track EP was not a true physical album because its USB linked to a site where buyers could download the songs rather than actually containing the tracks themselves.
According to Yonhap News, KMCIA’s decision was based on South Korean copyright law that defines an album as a physical object featuring music. If it goes uncontested, the decision will negatively impact G-Dragon’s success on other local music charts. It will also have a negative effect on weekly music programs, including SBS’ Inkigayo and MBC’s Show! Music Core, where the best-selling artists of the week, based on several categories including chart rankings, are awarded prizes.
G-Dragon addressed the debacle on Instagram, with a post titled “What’s the Problem?” “Everything in the world has pros and cons, but the external form of music records has consistently changed from cassette tape to CD and then to download file,” the artist wrote. “Isn’t the most important thing for music a good melody that will linger on the ears, mouths and minds of people for a long time and the lyrics that can touch people and make them laugh and cry?”
“We think that the whole issue is a structural problem, those holding on to the old way of thinking and not being able to accept the changes that are happening right now,” a YG Entertainment rep told Sports Dongha. “Why does music have to be stored only in CDs? This doesn’t make sense. … Devices change, but the most important thing is the melody and the lyrics that can stand the test of time and stay in people’s ears, mouths and minds as something precious and comforting.”
The USB links to a site containing photos, videos and download links for the five tracks of Kwon Ji Yong. It can be reused as a regular USB, providing a useful tool for fans who purchase the album, but remains controversial for pushing the boundaries of what is and what is not an album by KMCIA’s standard. Other sorts of nontraditional albums, such as digital-only releases, are also under scrutiny by the organization.

Click here to finish reading the article at Billboard.com